ANSWERS TO PASSOVER FOUR QUESTIONS

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The Passover Four Questions are the central theme of the Passover Seder in the Jewish table on the night of Passover. All the members of the family are partakers of this custom and usually the youngest in the family is the one who asks these four questions and answered by the older ones or the Seder leader. But even if there is no child in the family, these questions must still be asked among those who are at the table.

What are the Answers to the Four Questions

The section in Haggadah which is preceded by the Four Questions comprises the response to this question which directly states and pronounces the uniqueness of the practice made in the Seder.

The answer to each question obviously illustrates the explicit events in the story of Passover in the Bible and the emblematic definition of these events in accordance with the Passover festival. Here are the answers to the Four Questions and its symbolic significance:

Answer 1

“We only eat Matzah on this night because our ancestor on the time of their Exodus from slavery in Egypt had no time to bake bread for their provisions so they simply took the raw dough without leaven which is Matzah and cooked it on their journey.”

  • Matzah is known to be the “poor man’s bread,” cheap to produce and easy to make and therefore reminds them of their slavery and their immediate transition to freedom when they hastily left Egypt.

Answer 2

“We only eat Maror, the bitter herbs on this night which reminds us of the bitterness of slavery of our ancestors and the cruelty of Pharaoh’s treatment to the Jewish people in Egypt.”

  • The significance of the bitter herbs is very clear as it obviously describes the condition of the Jews in Egypt while they were in bondage. The Bible states in:

Exodus 1:14  And they made their lives bitter with hard bondage—in mortar, in brick, and in all manner of service in the field. All their service in which they made them served was with rigor.”

Answer 3

“We dip twice on this night, first the green vegetables on water; secondly the Maror in Charoses, a sweet mixture of nuts and wine which reminds us of the tears we cried while in Egypt as well as the miraculous deliverance we had when we fled out of Pharaoh’s evil hand.”

  • Dipping food is considered to be a luxurious act, a sign of freedom and royalty contrary to the poor and slaves who eat dried and un-dipped foods.

Answer 4

“We eat on a reclining position on this night because in the ancient times a person who eats in a reclined position depicts a free person, free from bondage and slavery. We therefore commemorate that we were once slaves but now are free.”

  • v There was a sudden change of situation and transformation in the Exodus from Egypt. On the night of the first Passover, Jews were still slaves but right in the morning they became a free nation.
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