PASSOVER BREAD

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One of the central themes and symbols of Passover is the Passover Bread. The commandment about the Passover bread should strictly be fulfilled in every Jewish house during the festival.  The Book of Exodus states that the Israelites should eat the bread which is unleavened for seven days during the Passover feast as a great reminder of their deliverance from bondage in Egypt.

Origin of Passover Bread

The Passover Bread is known as “Matzah” (Matzot in plural form), the bread which is without leaven or yeast. It is made simply of flour and water and cooked very quickly. This bread is one of the major parts of the Passover Seder.

In accordance to the Book of Exodus, when the Israelites were commanded by God to fled from Egypt right after God had passed over them, they have brought with them dough and kneading bowls. They baked the bread which is unleavened because they are in haste and could not wait. They don’t even have much time to prepare provision for themselves.

It was then that God instructed them to observe the Passover without any spot of leavened bread on every house of Israel and should only eat unleavened bread. It had served as an everlasting reminder to all Jews about their freedom and that God was with them when they left the land of Egypt.

The Significance of Passover Bread

The Unleavened Passover Bread plays a vital role not only during the Jews’ Exodus from Egypt but also in their entire lives as a nation of Israel.

The Passover bread signifies the redemption and freedom of Israel as a nation. It also exemplifies their salvation. That is why God instructed it to be a major part of the Seder in Passover so that they won’t have an excuse to forget what has happened to them as they left Egypt. It also describes that one should never be boastful but be humble and lowly in heart as it resembles a “poor man’s bread.” This unleavened bread also is a picture of holiness and purity just like how it is made with plain water and flour.

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