THE NAMES OF TU B’SHEVAT

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Tu B’Shevat in the Jewish tradition is a holiday observed every year by the Jews in Israel and in other parts of the world. This holiday doesn’t require them to prohibit from work though, they have an allotted time to have this festivity take place in their own houses.

The description and meaning of this holiday gives a clear impression of how substantial it is for the Jewish people and why it is celebrated in such manner.

Other Names of Tu B’Shevat

Tu B’Shevat is frequently denoted to as the New Year (or Birthday) of Trees and is regarded as one of the Jewish New Years or the Rosh Hashanahs. Though it is associated with the beginning of spring where earliest blooming trees like almonds start its fruit-yielding phase, it falls in the months of January and February in the Gregorian calendar. Tu B’Shevat signifies the emerging of a natural life as the year moves toward spring.

The Jewish communities established in the United States often celebrate this holiday by planting of trees, which they also called as National Arbor Day in Israel. They believe that tree-planting plays a very crucial and vital role in the restoration of their land so they are collecting money for funding this event in Israel. Through this holiday also, Jews nowadays are promoting an environmental awareness and preservation of the ecosystem which they consider in nurturing the world for the next generations to come.

Tu B’Shevat-What’s Behind the Name?

The word, Tu B’Shevat literally means “Fifteenth day in the month of Shevat,” the eleventh month in the Hebrew Calendar.

First, the word “Tu” is an abbreviation of two Hebrew letters that sums up into number 15. The word, “tet” is the ninth letter in Hebrew while “vav” is the sixth. Take note that “tet” has a “te” sound whereas; “vav” is a vowel with an “oo” sound in a vocalization of “shoorook.”

Secondly, Shevat is the eleventh month in the Hebrew calendar, with 30 full days beginning in the month of Nissan. Since during this month, fruit-yielding trees are blooming, the notion it brings is about renaissance and regeneration which symbolizes that the central coherence of life begins to take a stand. During the month of Shevat, Jews expand the holiness in the realm of eating as practice in

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